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Efficient planning for business trips

Trade fairs, conferences, customer meetings, contract signings – there are lots of good reasons to go on a business trip. And these trips are usually extremely important for a company’s development. However, this does not mean that organising the trip should take up more time and attention than necessary.

Depending on the size of the company, it is up to administrators or the owner themselves to organise business trips for the employees in addition to day-to-day tasks. Travel management is a demanding and labour-intensive activity. Booking airline tickets, accommodation and transport to the destination are just a few aspects to think about. In addition, for example, food expenses must be included in the planned budget. Here are a few tips to speed up and simplify the organisation process, while not losing sight of some important points.

 

1. Set up a budget

When you start planning, define a maximum amount that you want to spend on a business trip. Make sure you have a realistic budget based on flights, accommodation and transport, and don’t forget to include estimated costs for lunch and dinner. This will give you a general idea of what you are spending. With these figures you can plan well and optimise individual items.

 

2. Buy airline tickets in advance

The price of tickets is just one cost that affects the expenses. If you wait too long to purchase tickets, you are more likely to see fares rise – and your budget will need adjustment. Early booking also gives you a good chance of choosing the seats and travel classes that suit you best. Another tip: when planning and booking your tickets, also consider free incentive programmes such as PartnerPlusBenefit. For example, you can use them to get travel class upgrades and other services in exchange for redeeming points. And such an upgrade clearly improves the flight experience. Otherwise, the rule is: book early, upgrade late.

 

3. Book the hotel as early as possible

You should also arrange your accommodation as early as possible – especially if the trip is to include important conferences or large trade fairs. If you wait too long to book a hotel, the best establishments and rooms are already fully booked and you will have to settle for a hotel further away. However, less centrally located hotels are often less expensive and can save money. Before booking, also check the cost of local public transport. The cost-benefit ratio is not always positive and a hotel near the venue can often help you start the day more relaxed.

 

4. Be prepared for unforeseen circumstances

Even during a perfectly organised trip, unexpected events can occur. Having an alternative to hand is always good in such cases. For example, the option of a lounge visit in the event of delays is very valuable. In a lounge, the time spent waiting in comfortable and relaxed surroundings can be used sensibly. But there are also positive unforeseen events, such as the extension of a productive meeting. Here it is an advantage if colleagues are travelling on a flexible ticket.

 

5. Equipment safely delivered

 

At many events, trade fairs or customer appointments, the focus is not only on personal contact but also on products and information materials. Make sure that all the necessary equipment is delivered on time. Consider whether you can and want to transport samples and similar items yourself – for example as excess baggage. With bonus programmes such as PartnerPlusBenefit, you can usually redeem your points for excess baggage vouchers. If you have to transport heavy and bulky items, plan and book transport in good time. Have the equipment delivered to your hotel or directly to the conference location, for example.

 

Business trips are important for the company and the individual employee. However, good and coherent planning and a stress-free travel experience are crucial. Access to lounges, upgrades and Wi-Fi vouchers are the small conveniences that can positively influence the success of a trip – and with PartnerPlusBenefit they don’t necessarily have to influence the budget.

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